Yoga for Special Children

Special yoga with Jyoti Jo Manuel

Introduction to Joyoti works with children with complex needs and/or social/emotional needs. She provides classes and training worldwide

3:10 Offers trainings that are usually the result of people having taken her training and then asking her to give a training in their country. Special Yoga develops training for each country based on what is needed. Very flexible/adaptable in length of time and type of training given. Each person leaves the training with yoga tools to either help children with a broad range of needs or specific tools for specific needs. Can be a yoga teacher, paediatric professional, teacher, parent or  ?  Jyoti’s organisation works with schools, governments, non-profits, etc.

5:45 Offerings can be simplified but are very powerful so need a background in yoga. There are lots of access points to bring yoga to those who need it. Everyone finishing the course/workshop will have a tool box of appropriate yoga tools to help the children. 7 day workshop teaches a wide variety of tools for a wide variety of needs while shorter ones target specific tools for the participants.  Example: breath can be accessed through your own breathing, movement, sound, massage points, touch.

8:22 Training includes breathing, movement, relaxation. Yoga is the philosophy of being and this is the beginning point of all trainings. The 1st thing is how do you meet the needs of child and your needs. How do we connect? Our state of mind matters. Start all of the trainings by learning to meet the child in a loving, open way.

10:08 Jyoti used yoga tools to help a severely disabled child while he slept. He woke up happier and his mother said his body felt different . Jyoti has no idea of why it worked but intuitively it seemed the right thjng to do.  She knows that Yoga tools work but not exactly why they work. She is humble and grateful to do this work.

13:05 1st world workshops on a commercial basis, while 3rd world workshops are usually sponsored by governments, non-profits, schools, orphanages working together. Again the workshops are not targeted to a particular practitioner but to anyone that wishes to do this work.

16:10 7 day workshop in Sydney, 12-18 January 2019. !st time this workshop will be offered in Australia. People will leave the workshop empowered and inspired and will have tools to meet the needs of children. Will have tools and processes for children with a wide variety of needs. Practical and experiential practices.

17:40 Jyoti took her first yoga class in 1974 and realised that this was showing her a path for her life. She eventually opened a yoga studio in London and people with disabilities and children started coming to her classes.

20:00 Some cultures regard disabilities as bad and the child and his/her family may be ostracised by the community. Yoga has had amazing results with children and the children that received regular work with the yoga tools show great improvement in a variety of ways

22:20 Jyoti’s mission is to reach as many children as possible. The trainings provide a group of people with yoga tools to reach children all over the world.

23:05 Sydney workshop on the North Shore

  12-18/01/2019

7 day workshop for yoga professionals, paediatric professionals, parents, teachers, or anyone interested.

Next year she will have trainings in London, Ireland, Spain, maybe Mexico, Brazil.  Enquiries from: South Africa, Finland.

 Contact:

www.specialyoga.org.uk

FB: special yoga, jyoti jo manuel

Email: jyoti@specialyoga.org.uk

Trainings: www.specialyoga.org.uk/training/

Yogahood with Janaki Somaiya

Yogahood

Introduction of Janaki Somaiya and Yogahood

2:32 Yogahood started as a result of the founder’s experience of yoga’s benefits. Janaki is involved because of her psychology training and family interest in yoga. Janaki is a clinical psychologist working primarily with youth with mental health issues and knows the benefits for this population.

4:70 Yogahood is a not for profit organisation, that has partnerships with community organisations and also yoga studios and yoga brands. Community organisations have been approaching Yogahood to bring their classes to the community’s space. Yoga studios and yoga brands can help fund in many ways Yogahood’s activities. Yogahood’s volunteers go to the community sites to offer the classes.

8:00 Volunteer teachers must have 200 hour teacher training and 50 hours of teaching experience to take the 3 day Yogahood outreach training.  The class settings are very basic with just mats and some space; learning how to navigate a very different environment in which to give a class is one aspect of the training. The emphasis of the classes is to give people tools to take home and help them cope in their lives. Disadvantaged communities often have no opportunity to access yoga because of financial hardship.

12:45 Benefits to Students: Overall research shows many benefits of yoga. For youth with mental health issues, research indicates that yoga is helpful in stress, depression, etc. Yoga develops the pre-frontal cortex which is where planning, decision making and self-management occurs. This helps in dealing with stressors. Cognitive benefits include improving memory.

16:00 Young people, through yoga, are taught to tune in to their body and choose what they want to do that day according to how their body feels. They learn that is ok to listen to my body and do what it needs and then feel great when I do that.

17:30 Yogahood collects feedback and evaluates their program. Anecdotally, they hear that yoga helps participants manage their stress and better self-regulation among other improvements.

19:00 Yogahood’s training does provide some basic information on what teacher’s might expect when dealing with a wide range of participants with very different needs but can’t provide in depth. Each community organisation provides a person to be in the room during class. The volunteer is only responsible for teaching the class; the community person takes care of any issues that may arise. This is best for the teacher, the organisation and the participants. At the beginning of class, participants are told that the community person is there and if they have some issues to talk to that person.

21:25 Although Yogahood does provide some basic training in the issues that might occur, they also provide mentoring/pairing of a new volunteer with an experienced volunteer. They will teach the class together for a few classes so the new volunteer can receive feedback and get comfortable with his/her role.

23:25 Yogahood’s goals for the future are to provide the service to as many community organisations as possible given resources. It’s mission is to provide yoga to people who have needs for yoga’s tools. Talk therapy has limitations for some clients. It does not encourage thinking about one’s own body to help with the healing.  Research on trauma-based yoga shows that trauma basically sticks people in the trauma situation and they keep reliving it. Perceiving everything as a threat and living in the past and can’t physically let go of the trauma. Talk therapy may have them move mentally beyond the trauma but something has have help them move physically beyond the trauma.. They must ground themselves in the present which yoga does very well. Yoga increases the links between body, mind, breath. Yogahood is offering outreach training for new volunteers in early December.

31:45 Yogahood asks the volunteers to go into the community and work with people with high needs. Can be quite daunting for a volunteer. Yogahood offers wellness sessions for the volunteers to help them with their self-care and to maintain a balance in their lives. The wellness sessions may be a restorative yoga class, yin yoga, sound healing, massages.

Contact:

Website: www.yogahood.org.au

FB: YOGAHOOD.AUSTRALIA

Insta: #yogahoodau

Twitter: @yogahoodau

Embodied Yoga with Mark Walsh

 

Introduction of Mark and Embodied Yoga

2:04: Definition of Embodiment – Subjective aspect of the body

3:20 Mark came to embodiment yoga when he realised his life as a teenager was screwed up. With yoga and aikido, he realised there was a lot of beauty and richness in the movement and something in it for him. The next step how do I teach this to others.

4:25 Embodiment principles = life skills that can’t be learned from a book, i.e., leadership, yoga, stress management.

Practical life skills: breathe, peripheral vision, relax your tummy are skills to bring down your stress levels. The yoga teacher models relaxation and this flows out to the class and they also relax.

7:04  Yoga off the Mat - YouTube videos of Mark teaching embodiment principles. Asking students to take up space and being seen – spreading the arms and legs out and making yourself big and then bringing the limbs in and ducking the head to be small. People will feel comfortable in one of the opposing poses and not in the other. What is the emotion attached to being uncomfortable, is this a pattern of living are questions to ask to build a practice for yourself off the mat.

Can learn micropostures to do outside of the yoga class. Breath, extension, small movements of limbs that bring the essence of the pose and its emotional impact to daily life

12:00 Why and How does Yoga Change You?

  • Being with positive ethical people in a yoga class

  • Mindfulness of body, breath, emotions, posture

  • Chemical mechanisms

  • Practice gives you tools like persistence, dedication, etc.

Mark’s aim is to make that transfer of change off the mat more effective and efficient

14:02 What is the biggest change you have made because of yoga: he’s alive, sober, and in an intimate relationship. Need self-awareness, self-care, an self-regulation to be in a long-term, happy ,intimate relationship.

15:25 Embodiment is looking at how you are feeling in this pose, not the perfection of the form. Teaches that the postures are good enough – safe and can use as an enquiry. Doesn’t obsess about the form, but rather the emotions generated by the pose.  “Where do I need this pose in my life?”

17:29 What as yoga practitioners can we learn from other movement modalities?

  • First acknowledge that yoga is very dense and could be a life-long study.

  • Other disciplines an provide off the mat benefits

  • Can look at cultural bias

  • Why are students choosing this type of movement; is it a good or bad pattern for them?

19:38 Students come to Mark to explore themselves through movement. Each teacher has to decide what their aims are and fashion the practice to meet the aims. Using whatever movement modality is best. Mark has developed a system for confronting and exploring oneself and how to change the things the student wants to change.  As an example, Mark may do svasana in the middle of a workshop since the purpose of the pose is to explore what the student is dead to in their life or as a hard-core death meditation. It is inappropriate for the end of the class.

23:10 Modern yoga has evolved into the guru, hippy, Gordon Gecko model. Each has its positive sides: guru has tradition, Gordon Gecko is based on evidence-based, logic, exploration and the hippy questions hierarchy, lack of equality, acknowledging feeling in the somatic body. They each have a negative side.

27:13 Yoga in the 21st Century – yoga for everyone and flexibility of approach.

28:00 Resources: Free - E-books (e.g., Making Yoga Meaningful), Embodiment podcast, YouTube videos for those who have been in yoga for awhile and wanting something deeper. Teacher Training: Embodied Yoga Principles Training, Deepen Knowledge: Embodied Facilitator Course

Embodied Conference in mid-November 2018. Free, online with a wide variety of speakers.

 

Contacts:

Instagram: warkmalsh

FB: @leadership.coach.training

YouTube: Integration Training

Websites: www.embodiedyogaprinciples.com

www.embodiedfacilitator.com

The Perfect Amount of Challenge Dayna Pinkerton

Dayna Hanlon-Pinkerton #74

“The Perfect Amount of Challenge”

2:28 Introduction Dayna Hanlon-Pinkerton – experienced in yoga, yoga therapy and experiential education as a home educator for her children. Experiential education is very individualised similar to how a teacher/therapist develops a practice for either a yoga therapy client or a yoga student.

4:07 Testimonials on the website: Themes of intuition, meeting individual needs, “perfect amount of challenge”. Dayna tunes into the energy of the room before beginning class, (doesn’t plan her sequences before class). Starts with anchoring people and having fun with it, but with seriousness. Trying to teach them to hold space for two opposites – having fun and being serious – simultaneously. Teaching them to look at other viewpoints, not to be rigid, these are tools to help them.

11:49 Uses Pranyama as a tangible example of holding opposites. Feeling the fullness at the end of the inhalation and then the contrasting emptiness at the end of the exhalation. You can feel both of these opposites in your body within seconds of each other.

14:37 Dayna gave some presentations and mini-classes at a yoga festival, one of which she named “Way Clearing”. Her purpose was to harness energy to get our “stuff” out of the way like attachment, shifting energies to help people make the changes they want to make.

16:25 Dayna gets her inspiration from many places but also nature. Develops themes based on the cycles of nature. This may connect with a student or client but using nature is a good way to encourage reflection.

17:55 Dayna works with those suffering from anxiety and depression. Through her own journey, she is aware that the seat of healing is in the mind. She combines the koshas and the gunas to help people find a balance. To reflect on: “how long have I felt this way”, etc. (Gunas are three qualities that exist in nature – rajas: energy, passion, heightened end of emotions, tamas = darkness, inertia and then sattva = finding balance between these two extremes.

22:57 Look at yoga in the bigger picture; it is so much more than movement.  Helps students/clients see themselves.

Contacts:

Website: www.daynapinkerton.org

LinkedIn dayna-pinkerton-c-iayt

Pinterest: daynapinkerton

FB: dayna.hanlon-pinkerton

Integrating Dharma in Your Classes with Yael Sunshine

2:12 Introduction to Yael Sunshine and integrating dharma into class for those diagnosed with breast cancer.

2:58 Definition of Dharma: Following your inner guidance and connecting with universal principles.

3:51 Designing a class with dharma – start with 5 koshas (physical, mental, energy, thoughts, universal consciousness

4:35 What’s happening in their life because of the diagnosis – dealing with fear, choices are difficult because may be pressure from medical community and/or family.

5:55 Work on deep connection to self, in spite of fear, find authentic choices for themselves, surrender so they can navigate the illness

Give them more tools. Build a relationship between the concepts, ideas, to being felt in the body.

7:05 Difficult to go against medical advice, some can follow their own body’s cues, others may trust their doctor for the treatment.

8:55 Weave some specifics into the class: Ahimsa – violent self-talk, notice the quality of their thoughts, are they judging themselves, not listening to the body, violence against the body. Class pause reminded to come back to their thoughts and observe. Feeling betrayal of the body, anger at the cancer, do I do what the body needs. Observing Pratyhara, not being swayed by the sensory inputs, but listening closely to self and body without distractions. It is often a roller coaster ride and difficult to find and maintain equanimity. May just need to accept the emotions generated by the cancer journey. Using other somatic movements are helpful. Did a runway show where they were to walk down a “pretend” runway and say to themselves I am beautiful. In another instance, Yael gave them permission to say “Get your hands off me” This journey has a lot of people touching you without permission – medical personnel etc. and the cancer patients have little choice. Was a deeply felt emotion to take back control of the body. Can I inhabit and experience what I am feeling. Need space to express negative feelings; feelings that are socially unacceptable.

16:15 In each class, the students’ health is varied from just diagnosed, to being in treatment, to being in remission, etc. Class must be modified to match the energy of the students in the room. Although dharma and the goals of the class may not change, the asanas, breathing and meditation may be modified to reflect where the students are and what they need.

18:15 Teaching is dependent on intuition Cultivate being able to sense the energy in the room. Question the students on how they are feeling and what they want from the class and always have some ideas of what you can do given the situation of the class on that day. What is the final pose? How do we work up to it? What’s the emotion of that pose that people can feel? Need preplanning, experience, intuition. This is a learning experience for a new teacher and can only be obtained by teaching. Experienced teachers may rely too much on their experience, but planning what they want to achieve this month and what is the precept they want to offer and how to do that is also important?

24:21 Yael is an educator, so uses curriculum mapping and uses this tool to address planning for her yoga classes. What is the nature of the students, each class especially one that has a stable membership, has its own character. Different issues arise for different ages, conditions. Sometimes resistance is warranted, sometimes not. Using the 5 koshas to figure out a way to practice and organise the class. What is the most pressing issue?

Contact:

Websites: www.yaelsunshine.com

www.embodiedresiliencetechnique.com

FB: SundariWellness

Instagram: yaelsundari

Your Shift Matters: Breakdown to Breakthrough – book by Dana Zarcone. Yael has contributed a chapter.

Body Acceptance Beth Knudson

Body Acceptance with Beth Knudson

Opportunity: online course for accessible yoga for pregnant women

Online course information: http://bit.ly/HERSHA

15% on the course code: CFOYHERSHA. Limited offer.

 

2:08 Introduction – Beth Knudson – Body Acceptance and Understanding

3:20 “ We are not meant to be the same size all of our life.” Beth was a fitness instructor – helped people lose weight. She had eating disorders – anorexic, orthorexic. Helped women restrict their food, which leads to restrictions in your entire life. If we are restricting in any area of our life, then we are restricting our whole life.

What happens when we change the mindset from diet culture – massive amount of unravelling of beliefs. Start to reframe your thoughts, reframe your beliefs, can take years.

6:55 Started eating in an intuitive way. Listen to the cues of the body, understanding what those mean, so eating when you are hungry, understanding your body’s hunger and fullness cues.

All foods are equal, any food is OK at any time. Tune in to the body, honor those cues. Yoga is very helpful because it focuses on paying attention to physical cues and sensations. Meditation provides focus for internal dialogues. Gives you a practice to start listening to the body.

9:30 Thinking about your weight and what you are supposed to eat or not takes up a tremendous amount of mental time.

“Your life’s purpose is not a weight loss project” – using the weight loss project as a way to not deal with other areas of your life. We have all been carrying around a 20 lb rock and when we put it down, we can do other things.

12:20 The perception of yoga supports the “diet culture” – the young, slim, yoga body. This perception is a big obstacle but there is a group of rebels who are pushing that yoga is for everybody. Beth lives her life and her practice to model and authentic and honest yogi life. There is more than one way to be (a yogi).

14:30 Beth offers a variety of modalities:

Thai Yoga: assisted stretching. Client is totally passive, Beth provides a facilitated meditation with assisted stretching, rhythmic movements, pressure in soft tissues. Client gets into his/her body in a different way. People who don’t pay attention to their body, gets them into their body.

Ayurvedic Face Lift and Thai Reflexology: great ways to start for those with trauma. Both are very restricted in the areas that are touched so there is certainty about where they will be touched by someone else.

18:50 The process that Beth uses with new clients:

1 A get to know you call and see if Beth is the appropriate person for this person’s needs – can refer to others.

  1. Complete a questionnaire

  2. Meet face-to-face or online

  3. Beth envisions the overall structure concerning the sessions but the client directs. Where the body takes us, where the beliefs takes us. Using movement, journaling, meditation, art. Online can see each other so can do asanas remotely. Beth has cultivated a network of colleagues that she can refer the client to for face-to face work.

22:50 Diet culture – we have lost the ability to understand and notice our body’s cues. Cannot feel for ourselves. Works on more love for ourselves and our body. Work on interoception and pay attention to your body.

If we understand anatomy and physiology we would know that our body is amazing and miraculous. We should be in awe of our body. “We are not meant to be he same size and the same shape our entire life.”

Contacts:

Website: www.bethknudson.com

FB group: make  peace with  your body

Yoga Retreats with Lauren Maher

Highlights:

Benefits of yoga retreats

Different types of retreats: one day, multi-day, international

Look at the story we tell ourselves about our life

 

1:30 Introduction to Lauren Maher and Volare Retreats

2:38       Therapeutic Benefits of Retreats

Breaks down barriers between people and barriers within yourself, Brings people into community,Time to be introspective, Longer retreats give you the opportunity to establish a personal practice

6:21       Shorter retreats – asks attendees what they are experiencing to establish a thread  to plan  the retreat.

International retreats – a chance to leave stress and anxiety behind. Forming support systems, intention to do yoga.

8:27       Benefits articulated by students

Fresh eye and new perspective, Find like-minded friends, Step our of our environment and can make needed changes, Feeds your soul

13:39     Lauren offers a variety of retreats: one day retreats in the LA area, multi-day retreats in California, and longer retreats internationally.

15:01     People choose an international retreat in Lauren’s experience: they are seekers in life, want to partake of the culture, see the art, eat the food, interested in life. They have a spiritual side and also want to do some yoga.

17:07     Lauren’s retreats include yoga but also exploring the culture, the area, the art, wine, and food.

19:39     Retreats give us the time and space to explore the stories we tell ourselves about our life.

23:30     Travel generates resilience.

 

Contact Details:

Yoga website: www.breathedeepyoga.com

Travel website: www.volareretreats.com

FB: breathedeepyoga1

Insta: @breathedeepyoga

Twitter: #breathedeepyoga

 

Yoga for Eating Disorders

Yoga Research into Eating Disorders

Highlights:

Research: If and how yoga is beneficial to individuals with eating disorders.

Using western protocols for research

At the beginning, she wanted to research the effect of faulty interoception, objectification, and trauma on the eating disorders. And how yoga may be beneficial.

Standardised the classes so all yoga teachers were essentially teaching the same things in a trauma-informed yoga class.

Asked the yoga teachers and the clinicians there observations of the benefit of yoga.

Outcomes: In addition to the research paper, Nikola developed a series of protocols   for giving a yoga class for individuals with eating disorders. These protocols are available at www.adoreyoga.com/blog/  

 

 

1:06 Introduction

2:07 Yoga Research in the popular press

            The number of yoga research projects (in the West) has increased in the last 10 years. The media writes about how yoga helps people with a variety of   issues but with little detail about what exactly did the yoga given look like and how did it help the participants. Without this particular information, doing the wrong kind of yoga given the condition may exacerbate the problem.

6:00 Nikola’s guidelines for her research into the effect of yoga on teenagers with          eating disorders:

  1. a) must be evidence-based,
  2. b) look for what is helpful,
  3. c) how do we measure what is helpful,
  4. d) start with a literature search.

8:10 Nikola found there were three elements that may be involved with why people have eating disorders.

  1. a) Interoception: receptors throughout the body are always reporting on what is happening in the body, things like digestion, blood pressure, hunger, etc. People with eating disorders may not be able to feel their body or they misinterpret what they are feeling.
  2. b) Objectification: A person only values certain parts of themselves i.e., their looks or their body.
  3. c) Suffering trauma: childhood sexual abuse may be a contributing factor in eating disorders

Nikola wasn’t allowed to actually directly measure what happened to the patients that were in the yoga class (it was considered unacceptable to ask very sick children these types of questions).

Modifying the research, the researchers decided to ask the yoga teachers giving the intervention and the clinicians working with the teenagers what they saw as a result of the yoga intervention. Anecdotally, the participants felt it had helped them.  The yoga teachers and clinicians also saw improvement and gave very positive feedback.

17:29 The intervention was a 10 week term with one yoga class a week. The yoga teachers were given a template for the classes so that the classes were standardised. It was based on the precepts of trauma-informed yoga and designed using the lenses of yoga therapy. Language is invitational, there were no alignment cues, students were given choice as to how to do the pose within the bounds of safety. Gave students a choice which is very rare during their treatment.

29:50 Outcome: In addition to the research paper, Nikola has designed a set of protocols for yoga teachers or clinicians that want to add yoga to their treatment plans. These protocols are can be accessed on Nikola’s website.

Contact:

Website: www.adoreyoga.com

Email:nikola@adoreyoga.com

FB, Insta, Twitter: adoreyoga

Yoga Retreats for Cancer Sufferers with Lee Majewski

Highlights: Intensive Yoga Retreats for Cancer Patients

Lee Majewski has created and implements a 3 week intensive for those diagnosed with cancer.

Anyone with the diagnosis, in or finished with treatment can attend the retreats.

Yoga tools are taught to help them with their fear, feeling like a victim and negative thought patterns

6 years of research shows significant benefits for the attendees.

 

1:16 Introduction to Lee Majewski

3:15  Created a 3 week Intensive Retreat for Cancer Sufferers. Based on her own experience of cancer. There is a gap in care for cancer patients in that during or after the medical treatments there is no support or resources for dealing with the effects of the diagnosis or treatments.

6:20   Anyone who has been diagnosed with cancer, in treatment or finished with treatments of any type of cancer is eligible to attend the retreat. Each attendee develops with the facilatators their unique practice. Small groups

7:40 A typical day:

Asana and pranayama early, yoga lecture, pranayama and meditation, restorative yoga with mudras/guided meditation, yoga nidra. Chanting. Each is developing their own practice using tools they need to help them with their cancer journey.

10:45 Lee has done research on the effects of the retreat. Attendees take standardised psychological tests the first day, the last day and 3 months after. They have recently added tests at 6 months and 12 months post-retreat. They have 6 years of data.

14:00 Attendees Benefits: given back their control and lose their victim status. Many feel fear and/or depression. The tests show marked decrease in depression over the course of the retreat.

17:00 Structure of the retreat

First week: getting used to the place, diet, techniques, yoga and the other attendees.

Second week: Face their own fears, give them tools to help with these fears

Third week: Learn to manage their thought patterns. Establish their own unique practices and how to find time to do the practices daily.

23:10 Lee has also designed a chronic disease retreat based on the same organisation.

25:00 Contacts

Website: www.yogaforhealth.institute

Email: info@yogaforhealth.institute

FB: cancerdetox

25:37 Lee is looking for other yoga therapists to help her spread these retreats to other English speaking countries and then worldwide.

Future of Yoga- Part 2 - Acting ethically in the classroom

Download the podcast here

I welcome Linda Baird to the podcast to talk about ethics in yoga. She brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the topic. We discuss how to be ethical in the classroom given that yoga teachers and yoga therapists have by nature of the job more power than their students. Linda emphasises that the most important concept in ethics is to have a relationship with your students. To genuinely care for them, to be aware of how they are doing in class, to ask questions to understand instead of assuming are some of the tips she gives. She also discusses ways to be ethical is large classes and how to be present and lead from the heart as a yoga teacher.