Embodied Yoga with Mark Walsh

 

Introduction of Mark and Embodied Yoga

2:04: Definition of Embodiment – Subjective aspect of the body

3:20 Mark came to embodiment yoga when he realised his life as a teenager was screwed up. With yoga and aikido, he realised there was a lot of beauty and richness in the movement and something in it for him. The next step how do I teach this to others.

4:25 Embodiment principles = life skills that can’t be learned from a book, i.e., leadership, yoga, stress management.

Practical life skills: breathe, peripheral vision, relax your tummy are skills to bring down your stress levels. The yoga teacher models relaxation and this flows out to the class and they also relax.

7:04  Yoga off the Mat - YouTube videos of Mark teaching embodiment principles. Asking students to take up space and being seen – spreading the arms and legs out and making yourself big and then bringing the limbs in and ducking the head to be small. People will feel comfortable in one of the opposing poses and not in the other. What is the emotion attached to being uncomfortable, is this a pattern of living are questions to ask to build a practice for yourself off the mat.

Can learn micropostures to do outside of the yoga class. Breath, extension, small movements of limbs that bring the essence of the pose and its emotional impact to daily life

12:00 Why and How does Yoga Change You?

  • Being with positive ethical people in a yoga class

  • Mindfulness of body, breath, emotions, posture

  • Chemical mechanisms

  • Practice gives you tools like persistence, dedication, etc.

Mark’s aim is to make that transfer of change off the mat more effective and efficient

14:02 What is the biggest change you have made because of yoga: he’s alive, sober, and in an intimate relationship. Need self-awareness, self-care, an self-regulation to be in a long-term, happy ,intimate relationship.

15:25 Embodiment is looking at how you are feeling in this pose, not the perfection of the form. Teaches that the postures are good enough – safe and can use as an enquiry. Doesn’t obsess about the form, but rather the emotions generated by the pose.  “Where do I need this pose in my life?”

17:29 What as yoga practitioners can we learn from other movement modalities?

  • First acknowledge that yoga is very dense and could be a life-long study.

  • Other disciplines an provide off the mat benefits

  • Can look at cultural bias

  • Why are students choosing this type of movement; is it a good or bad pattern for them?

19:38 Students come to Mark to explore themselves through movement. Each teacher has to decide what their aims are and fashion the practice to meet the aims. Using whatever movement modality is best. Mark has developed a system for confronting and exploring oneself and how to change the things the student wants to change.  As an example, Mark may do svasana in the middle of a workshop since the purpose of the pose is to explore what the student is dead to in their life or as a hard-core death meditation. It is inappropriate for the end of the class.

23:10 Modern yoga has evolved into the guru, hippy, Gordon Gecko model. Each has its positive sides: guru has tradition, Gordon Gecko is based on evidence-based, logic, exploration and the hippy questions hierarchy, lack of equality, acknowledging feeling in the somatic body. They each have a negative side.

27:13 Yoga in the 21st Century – yoga for everyone and flexibility of approach.

28:00 Resources: Free - E-books (e.g., Making Yoga Meaningful), Embodiment podcast, YouTube videos for those who have been in yoga for awhile and wanting something deeper. Teacher Training: Embodied Yoga Principles Training, Deepen Knowledge: Embodied Facilitator Course

Embodied Conference in mid-November 2018. Free, online with a wide variety of speakers.

 

Contacts:

Instagram: warkmalsh

FB: @leadership.coach.training

YouTube: Integration Training

Websites: www.embodiedyogaprinciples.com

www.embodiedfacilitator.com

Yoga for Eating Disorders

Yoga Research into Eating Disorders

Highlights:

Research: If and how yoga is beneficial to individuals with eating disorders.

Using western protocols for research

At the beginning, she wanted to research the effect of faulty interoception, objectification, and trauma on the eating disorders. And how yoga may be beneficial.

Standardised the classes so all yoga teachers were essentially teaching the same things in a trauma-informed yoga class.

Asked the yoga teachers and the clinicians there observations of the benefit of yoga.

Outcomes: In addition to the research paper, Nikola developed a series of protocols   for giving a yoga class for individuals with eating disorders. These protocols are available at www.adoreyoga.com/blog/  

 

 

1:06 Introduction

2:07 Yoga Research in the popular press

            The number of yoga research projects (in the West) has increased in the last 10 years. The media writes about how yoga helps people with a variety of   issues but with little detail about what exactly did the yoga given look like and how did it help the participants. Without this particular information, doing the wrong kind of yoga given the condition may exacerbate the problem.

6:00 Nikola’s guidelines for her research into the effect of yoga on teenagers with          eating disorders:

  1. a) must be evidence-based,
  2. b) look for what is helpful,
  3. c) how do we measure what is helpful,
  4. d) start with a literature search.

8:10 Nikola found there were three elements that may be involved with why people have eating disorders.

  1. a) Interoception: receptors throughout the body are always reporting on what is happening in the body, things like digestion, blood pressure, hunger, etc. People with eating disorders may not be able to feel their body or they misinterpret what they are feeling.
  2. b) Objectification: A person only values certain parts of themselves i.e., their looks or their body.
  3. c) Suffering trauma: childhood sexual abuse may be a contributing factor in eating disorders

Nikola wasn’t allowed to actually directly measure what happened to the patients that were in the yoga class (it was considered unacceptable to ask very sick children these types of questions).

Modifying the research, the researchers decided to ask the yoga teachers giving the intervention and the clinicians working with the teenagers what they saw as a result of the yoga intervention. Anecdotally, the participants felt it had helped them.  The yoga teachers and clinicians also saw improvement and gave very positive feedback.

17:29 The intervention was a 10 week term with one yoga class a week. The yoga teachers were given a template for the classes so that the classes were standardised. It was based on the precepts of trauma-informed yoga and designed using the lenses of yoga therapy. Language is invitational, there were no alignment cues, students were given choice as to how to do the pose within the bounds of safety. Gave students a choice which is very rare during their treatment.

29:50 Outcome: In addition to the research paper, Nikola has designed a set of protocols for yoga teachers or clinicians that want to add yoga to their treatment plans. These protocols are can be accessed on Nikola’s website.

Contact:

Website: www.adoreyoga.com

Email:nikola@adoreyoga.com

FB, Insta, Twitter: adoreyoga