Yoga For Arthritis with Steffany Moonaz

 Yoga for Arthritis

Introduction

2:31 As a dancer, Steffany understood movement could be a strategy to alleviate suffering. As a child, she wanted to help people find this state for themselves and suffer less. Wanted to help people find a mind-body connection to be fully engaged in the present thought the experience of what is happening in their bodies and alleviate suffering. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability

6:00 Min-body practice defined by National Center  for Complementary and Integrated Health. Many kinds of mind-body practices that you can do yourself. Mind-body practices are strategies for self-care. Treatment can be passive like drugs or give people the tools for self-care like a yoga class. Changing the way we live by using self-care tools.

8:00 Research: clinical experience and personal perception. Yoga works because we can see the benefits for students, clients and ourselves. Research aims to reduce the personal perception bias. Yoga also is aware of being able to tell the difference between one subjective experience and and our objective reality.

Our decisions must be informed by both to make decisions. Expert opinion (training, gurus, etc.), clinical preference (client’s need),  and generalisable evidence from well-designed research studies. The third one is viewed most strongly by decision and policy makers. Yoga research conducted with modern health research guidelines is fairly new. Last few decades  yoga research was not funded resulting in very small studies that showed promising results. They indicated that yoga was safe to do. These original studies brought research funding to yoga to now do research with rigorous design. Dose (how often), style, poses, comparison with other modalities are now part of yoga research. Results from 1 research study is 1 piece of a 1,000 piece jigsaw puzzle. It is difficult to really understand if yoga is beneficial from that one study. But a thousand studies brings the whole picture and much more confidence in yoga’s benefits. Tips to help someone who is unsure on how to review research studies. Read summary research – meta-analysis, systematic reviews – by an expert in the field. They will be very knowledgeable and by looking at several pieces of the jigsaw will have a better idea of what the research says about a yoga topic.

19:55 Steffany is developing Guidelines for Clinical Research.  If you are writing about yoga research, these guidelines tell you what must be reported so that the research is designed correctly. Things like: yoga style, poses, modifications, time spent in each pose, etc. Without this kind of information, no one can make a recommendation for or against.

23:11 Yoga for Arthritis: developed rigorous, randomised control group structure, replicated with another population research on the benefits of yoga for arthritis.

Yoga works, but that conclusion is based on how yoga is taught. Yoga is safe and appropriate for people with arthritis, decreases pain. Steffany’s research showed a 30% decrease in pain (comparable to drugs) but no side effects. Yoga can transform life, even without pain decrease. Research shows Yoga can improve quality of life, mental health and depressive symptoms. Study reports  changes in the clinical assessment of joints. Received funding from Arthritis Foundation. Subsequent studies included qualitative (peoples’ stories about yoga’s effects) and quantitative aspects.  (Arthritis Foundation asked Steffany to develop a DVD  which is available on the Arthritis Foundation website. The Yoga for Arthritis website has additional resources.

29:18 Steffany has written a book: ”Yoga Therapy for Arthritis” that will be published December 2018. Arthritis affects the whole person; yoga intervenes on every level. Uses the Pancha Maya Kosha system to see the effects of arthritis on each kosha. It is illustrated by a series of personal stories of people living with arthritis and how yoga facilitates personal transformations. Includes a section on lots of different practices and modifications.

The book is for three audiences: Yoga professionals, people with arthritis, and health professionals

33:59 Anyone can suffer from arthritis: 300,000 children have arthritis is the US. Self-concept is changed by arthritis as well as movement. A participant in Steffany’s research had arthritis in her twenties and it significantly affected her life as she was a dancer and gymnast.  Through yoga she came to realise she and her body could partners in dealing with the arthritis.

38:45 Steffany offers Teacher Training in Yoga for Arthritis. 3 Levels: 1st level – provides protocol for 8 week / 16 classes based on her research. Level 2: 1-1 mentoring for teachers, detailing how to teach. Level 3: 1 to 1 practice – yoga therapy.

Training in several cities in Us, starting a hybrid on-line programs

42:50 Open invitation to listeners to send questions to Steffany and she will try to answer them.

 

Contacts:

www.arthritis.yoga

FB: yoga4arthritis

info@arthritis.yoga

Book: “Yoga Therapy for Arthritis: A whole-person approach for Movement and Lifestyle” by Steffany Moonaz

Slow Postpartum with Jojo Hogan

Introduction to Jojo and Slow Postpartum

3:29 Slow Postpartum is the time after the birth of the baby and the women in taken care of by her community. Time  is 30-40 days of complete rest and care: support, nourishment, and time to heal and bond with the baby. Quite common in several cultures around the world.

When a women has a baby, the brain recalibrates and parts of the brain start interacting for the first time as the women becomes a mother. This transformation needs time, care, nourishment, healing, and making connection with the baby. Matriescence = moving from being a woman to being a mother.

8:00 Jojo teaches yoga classes to pregnant women. Yoga is helpful during the birth, and postpartum can also be helped by yoga but in a different form.

9:30 Pregnant and postpartum body are very different. Many new pregnant students coming to a yoga class are beginners. They have relaxin hormone in their bodies which loosens muscles, tendons, ligaments. Have to be careful not to push into the joints, hyperextension. Postpartum body is different: will still have relaxin for weeks or months. Body is very open from giving birth; the pelvic floor muscles have been greatly stretched. Body is open: physically, mentally and spiritually. Can’t do poses that they did before pregnancy for weeks or months. Need a teacher that understands the postpartum body.

13:49 Postpartum mums and bubs classes: very common for someone to be crying either babies or mums. Jojo recommends that they don’t come for at least 6 weeks. Mums are very sleep deprived, hormonal, anxious. The class is for the women; body needs caring, nourishing and yoga can be beneficial. They are told to make the class what they need it to be. Social interaction with other new mums is very important.

17:30 Helpful poses and contraindicated poses during this period. Women may have C-section scars, and/or separation of the rectus abdominus. So very slowly, methodically strengthen the abdominal muscles and pelvic floor. Contraindicated poses include twists, especially deep seated twists and plank  because they destabilise the core. Remain careful about pushing into the joints. Poses should close the pelvic area, not stretch it. Shoulder stretches are very helpful because of always holding the baby. Babies naturally do yoga as they stretch and move their bodies.

21:00 Jojo does offer her postpartum doula clients training in meditation. Women in the postpartum class are told to do savasana in any position that they want. They are to come into the present and just be with their baby.

23:08 Body in postpartum needs care, nourishing and support. Find a teacher that is familiar with the postpartum body’s needs. Shouldn’t return to pregnancy, gym or regular yoga classes  as they are not suitable for the postpartum body. Your baby is your yoga at this time. Motherhood is a deeply spiritual practice, you learn patience, accept how things are instead of how you want them to be, unlimited and unconditional love.

26:15 Returning to regular classes is very individualised. High impact classes not before 6 months, regular classes not for 12 weeks. Listen to your body.

Contact:

Website: www.slowpostpartum.com

FB: slowpostpartum

Insta: #slowpostpartum.

Body Positive Yoga with Amber Karnes

Introduction – Amber Karnes and Body Positive Yoga

 

2:40 Consent, Agency, Body Sovereignty

                Consent: There is culture around touch in yoga. Many people don’t want to be touched. Only uses touch in cases of safety or to point out certain things the student may not understand. How to ensure a consent mindset is to set a focus that the student and teacher are working together but student controls what the body does. Touch is not optional; students are the experts concerning their bodies. Each pose is an enquiry about your own body and you have agency about what your body will do. Models of Consent: must an enthusiastic yes, consent cards, students understand what adjustment means and how it might be done, students have the right during any part of class to refuse touch.  Amber is interested in any other techniques from the listeners about how they handle consent.

14:20 Agency – Amber has practiced yoga in a fat body for 15 years. Originally, she couldn’t find a teacher to modify her poses to accommodate her body. She had to create her own practice to make it work for the body she had. Loved the benefits of yoga so she figured out a lot on her own. Large-bodied individuals, disabled students need modifications. Not here to fix someone or someone’s body, we are offering tools to empower students to do yoga. We need to learn how to teach others since we were trained to teach other yoga teachers in our teacher training. If the student leaves with a successful experience, then they will probably return.

22:10 Tips for studio owners, teachers to make the space inclusive. Is it physically accessible for people disabled or elderly or injured? Is it financially accessible? Do you offer scholarship opportunities or subsidised rates? Letting others who can afford to pay above the rate to help those who cannot pay.  Do you have diverse teachers? Are students going to see someone like them?  What kind of photographs do you use in your marketing? Yoga language or?

What is the purpose of the Asana? Can you duplicate that purpose with modifications, props or other asanas if the first asana is not appropriate?

30:45 How did yoga help Amber make peace with her body? Recommended by her physical trainer to do yoga on the off days since it would burn calories but wasn’t considered exercise. Went to her first class and she was the only bigger bodied person. She attended the class and left when it was over and noticed that the negative self-talk started which meant that at some period before it had stopped. She felt so good afterwards that she returned to class. Yoga made a huge difference in her emotional state. Found a teacher who could help. She had been fighting against her body, but yoga gave her the tools to partner with her body and accept her body.

38:38 Body Positive Movement – get to a place of acceptance and peace with the body. Free of emotional energy  in not fighting the boy. Yoga is the best tool for self-regulation.

 

Contacts:

Website: www.bodypositiveyoga.com

Insta: AmberKarnesOfficial

FB: bodypositiveyoga

Resources:

Yoga for All Teacher Training – 35 hours online at www.yogaforalltraining.com

www.accessibletraining.com 3 day in person training in several places around the world

Yoga for Osteopororis with Stephanie Cunningham

Yoga For Osteoporosis

 

Introduction to Osteoporosis: bones become fragile which leads to increased risk of fractures. May be due to bone mineral decreases or the failure of the microarchitecture.

 

2:54 Causes:

  1. At menopause, the cells that destroy bone become more active than the cells that build bone. These are both natural processes but the balance is disturbed as the sex hormones decrease

  2. In the later years of life 80+ the muscles and the bones become more fragile. Without the muscles pulling on the bones (and as they lose strength, this happens naturally), the bones also become weaker

  3. Illness and drugs can also affect the bone density.

5:30  No symptoms there is a test called the DEXA test that measures bone density (but not bone microarchitecture) It tests three sites on the body: hip, vertebrae and wrist. Each site receives it’s own score.

  1. Normal Score; men and women naturally lose bone density in their fifties but the loss is not enough to increase the risk of fracture

  2. Osteopenia: there is bone loss in excess of normal bone loss and the risk of fracture is increased

  3. Osteoporosis: there is significant bone loss and the risk of fracture is high.

Vertebral fractures can also lead to kyphosis which is 1) a risk factor for more vertebral fractures, it impacts breathing and balance.

9:59 Exercise, especially weight-bearing exercise, is recommended to move the muscles that then pull on the bones to signal the need for increased density.

Axial Skeleton – skull, vertebrae, ribs. Protects the core organs and gives structure to the trunk. Women lose more bone (as a percentage) from the axial skeleton than men do so they have an increased risk of vertebral fractures.

Need strong core muscles to protect the bones and to help with holding up the trunk.

11:35 Dr. Mersheed Sinaki, has done several studies on osteoporosis at the Mayo Clinic in the US. She recommends more than just weight-bearing exercise but also need to improve a) flexibility, b) core strength, c) cardiovascular fitness, d) axial strength, and e) gait steadiness (to prevent falls from loss of balance).

13:00 Yoga poses to strengthen the axial skeleton (primarily the vertebrae).

  • Laying down: Gentle locust; laying on the stomach, lift the head (in line with the spine) and then release. After building strength with the previous pose, can then transition to clasping the hands behind the back, lifting the head and chest and pulling with the hands towards the feet. Another gentle pose would be to lay on back and lift head and then release,

 

  • Standing: With one arm on a chair if needed, lift one arm above the head with the inhale and let it come down with the exhale. Do the other arm. With sufficient strength, can use weights or lift both arms up at the same time (with or without weights).

 

  • Sitting: Bring arms to shoulder height; bend elbows so hand are pointing towards the ceiling and try to press the elbows together and then release. If the student cannot bring the arms to shoulder height, then place the arms along the side and bend the elbows and then press the elbows and release.

 

16:45 Appendicular Skeleton: limbs, hip and shoulder girdles. Breaks in hip are often at the neck of the femur which causes a fall. Hip fractures are highly correlated with death in older individuals so a hip fracture is quite dangerous. Wrist fractures often occur when trying to stop a fall. And falls increase fracture risk.

            Yoga poses:

  1. most standing poses (not Warrior I),

  2. Downward dog (can be modified with chair or wall), and

  3. balance poses.

19:34 Contraindicated poses

  1. Inversions

  2. seated twists, forward bends, bridge

  3. Warrior I

24:30 With kyphosis, yoga can provide tools to help breathing. Need more space in the chest to allow the lungs to fully inflate.

25:25 New study correlates disturbed sleep with osteoporosis. Yoga Nidra is good for showing students how to relax and can be a tool to help them sleep at night. Or any relaxation tool used in savasana.

Research:

Yoga Vetebral Fractures & Osteoporosis: Research and Recommendations, Norlyk, E., Boses, A., International Journal of Yoga Therapy, No. 23 (1) 2013

Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation in Patients with Osteoporosis: Rehabilitation of Osteoporosis Program (ROPE), Sinaki, M., Journal für Mineralstoffwechsel & Muskuloskelettale Erkrankungen 2010

Yoga Spinal Flexion Positions an Vertebral Compression Fracture in Ostepenia and Osteoporosis of the Spine: Case Series Sinaki, M., MD, MS Clinical Report

https://www.ncbi.nim.nih.gov/pubmed 22449949

Impact of Sleep on Osteoporosis: Sleep quality is associated with bone stiffness index, Sasaki, N., Fujiwara, S., Yamashita, H., Ozono, R., Teramen, K., Kihara, Y.

Sleep Medicine 2016 Sept: 25: 73-77

Comments:

www.yogalightness.com.au/podcasts/

Mindfulness and Grief with Heather Stang

Heather Stang SN

 

Yoga and Grief

Introduction of Heather and the topic

5:05 Tips to stay healthy while grieving. Sleep, digesting, hydrating may all be difficult. Yoga is one of the activities that can be accessed early. Doesn’t require talking about our emotions and brings us back into the body. Can help with sleeping, digesting and hydrating. People are dealing with the ongoing connection they feel with the person who died. The relationship continues.

7:50 Myth has been that you “get over” grief by detaching from the person who died. Research shows that maintaining a continuing bond helps with living your life.

8:20 What to do for the teacher and other class members when a long-time member of a yoga class dies. Understanding that the class needs to be modified, slow the pace, each person encouraged to share their feelings, perhaps a letter to the person or write down feelings.  Open ended yoga questions: what does grief feel like in your body. Create a yoga pose to reflect those feelings What would a statue look like that represents the person who died. Have your boecaedy look like that pose. Allow people to speak freely about their grief. Disenfranchised grief – not allowed to speak freely because of a perceived social position. For instance, a friend’s grief is not as valued as a family member’s grief.

14:20 Anniversaries of death can be difficult in the yoga class. If student share a date, then keep note of that because often time coming up to the anniversary is difficult for the person. The grieving person needs to plan ahead of the anniversary to do what they need to do that helps them

18:09 Heather has written a book called: Mindfulness and Grief. She had started Yoga and Grief previously, an 8 week program for people grieving. She was also exploring meditation in more depth. She interviewed past participants of the yoga and grief classes to see what the long term result of the classes were. The book is in an 8 week format, but can be done in the time period that an individual needs. There are a variety of tools to address the physical symptoms of – anxiety, tension – and tools to use for their life after loss. Chapters are: Mindful Awareness, Conscious Relaxation, Compassion/Forgiveness, Vulnerability and Courage, Unstuck, Reconstruction and Transformation. Each week/chapter has tools for that week including journaling, creative projects, yoga.

Grief permanently changes you in many ways and the change may even be positive.

Yoga consists of ancient techniques to tend to our suffering.

26:15 Grief does not have to look a certain way; it is different for everybody. Some show their emotions easily, others show little emotion but both are grieving. Yoga teachers may be dealing with our own grief and need to take care of ourselves also

28:10 Recommended books:

Mindfulness and Grief by Heather Stang

Trauma Sensitive Mindfulness by David Treleven

IRest Program for Healing PTSD by Richard Miller

All are available on Amazon

Contacts:

Website: www.mindfulnessandgrief.com

Insta #mindfulgriefquotes

Twitter: @HeatherStangMA

FB: mindfulnessgrief

What is it like to be an Australia Yoga Teacher in 2018

What does it look like to be an Australian Yoga Teacher in 2018?

With Cate Peterson

 Opportunity: Hersha Yoga is offering an online course to expand your knowledge of teaching pregnant women with medical issues. To explore the course: http://bit.ly/HERSHA  If you choose to take the course, use this code CFOYHERSHA to receive 15% off. This is a limited offer with set amount of places available at this reduced rate.

2:30 Introduction to Cate and to the topic

Cate believes Yoga is a vehicle for social action and has created/or is part of many organisations doing that.

2:55 What does it look like to be a yoga teacher in 2018 vs. What does it look like to be an Australian yoga teacher in 2018? These are different because we are connected to a country that has the oldest, living, continuous culture on the planet. Aboriginal culture has two major precepts - taking care of the land and practicing what it is to be human that apply to this conversation about yoga. What can we learn as yogis from this ancient and modern culture for our yoga practice? GetOffOurAsana, IYTA, Yoga Australia, and Off the Mat and Into the World have handed out about 2000 postcards encouraging yoga teachers to start their yoga classes with acknowledging country. Paying respect to country and its custodians is more common in Australia than many other parts of the world.

6:50 Yoga Australia is working the relationship between Australian yoga teachers and the elders of the Aboriginal communities around Australia. Aboriginal yoga teachers look at teaching yoga to through different lens because of their cultural background although there are similarities. But yoga must be tailored/taught differently within their communities. The British colonised Australia 240 years ago, very destructive and they tried to destroy the Aboriginal culture. It went underground and has remained strong. Harshness of Australian climate, the Aboriginal people had to maintain their health through dance, ritual movement, nutrition, fasting and pushing the body to the limits, coming together in song to relate to one another and dadirii, aboriginal meditation techniques. Many of these same activities are also in the yoga culture. What can we as Australian yoga teachers learn from and use in our practice.

12:30 Cultural appropriation is a contentious topic in yoga right now; is it Ok to practice another culture’s spiritual practices? Is it Ok to use the cultures images, symbols, techniques out of context? Yoga is 6000 years old, drawing from that about how to be human. But are we paying sufficient respect to the roots of yoga?

14:25 Yoga is evolutionary discipline and changes as the need changes. Can we (should we) meld the Indian lineages of yoga with the Australian Aboriginal culture? Don’t know but the conversation needs to be started. Yoga Australia is starting this conversation. There are some parts of yoga that are easily distorted. Gurus from 19 lineages are in court for sexual misconduct. The guru model gives power and some will take advantage of that power. What is the appropriate model for teaching, or the passing of information?

19:30 In Aboriginal culture, traditionally individuals were stewards/advocates of some part of country – a tree species, an animal species, a waterway, etc. No one person was at the top.

20:55 Yoga is regaining our own physical, mental, spiritual being. What can we learn from the Aboriginal culture and how might that drive yoga in the future?

21:30 What is the goal for bringing together the yoga and Aboriginal communities? Asking yoga teachers to bring elders into their classes for welcome to country, to start conversations, stories of their culture.

23:40 How do you know that anything beneficial has occurred? The next step is to submit the reconciliation action plan (www.reconciliationaustralia.com) and have one year to reflect on the plan and bring communities together to decide what they want to do. When that is approved, then will start on the innovation reconciliation plan to actually put the ideas into place and to monitor and gather data. The third step is the elevate reconciliation plan where Yoga Australia etc will mentor other, similar organisations.

Each yoga teacher must ask permission to integrate these aboriginal tools into their practice. These are one on one discussions to open pathways, build relationships, community building is most important.

27: 35 How yoga was originally taught was to find a guru and the guru was responsible for giving you information as you were ready for it. They were there when you needed someone to go to when you were struggling with spiritual matters. How it looks in the future is unknown but starting the conversation is important?

 

Contacts:

act@getoffyourasana.com.au

Cate: 0419609991

Note: the crowdfunding Start Some Good that Cate mentions has not gone live yet but will so