Self-Compassion Meditation

Self-Compassion Meditation

Introduction: yoga nidra process – review, relax, and be compassionate

3:10 Review, relax and be thankful as you delve into the body. Legs, pelvis, torso, arms, neck and shoulders and head

15:15 Compassionate in our thoughts. Self-talk, forgiveness, kindness

18:00 Gently wake up the body

 

Contacts:

www.yogalightness.com.au

Yoga Retreats with Lauren Maher

Highlights:

Benefits of yoga retreats

Different types of retreats: one day, multi-day, international

Look at the story we tell ourselves about our life

 

1:30 Introduction to Lauren Maher and Volare Retreats

2:38       Therapeutic Benefits of Retreats

Breaks down barriers between people and barriers within yourself, Brings people into community,Time to be introspective, Longer retreats give you the opportunity to establish a personal practice

6:21       Shorter retreats – asks attendees what they are experiencing to establish a thread  to plan  the retreat.

International retreats – a chance to leave stress and anxiety behind. Forming support systems, intention to do yoga.

8:27       Benefits articulated by students

Fresh eye and new perspective, Find like-minded friends, Step our of our environment and can make needed changes, Feeds your soul

13:39     Lauren offers a variety of retreats: one day retreats in the LA area, multi-day retreats in California, and longer retreats internationally.

15:01     People choose an international retreat in Lauren’s experience: they are seekers in life, want to partake of the culture, see the art, eat the food, interested in life. They have a spiritual side and also want to do some yoga.

17:07     Lauren’s retreats include yoga but also exploring the culture, the area, the art, wine, and food.

19:39     Retreats give us the time and space to explore the stories we tell ourselves about our life.

23:30     Travel generates resilience.

 

Contact Details:

Yoga website: www.breathedeepyoga.com

Travel website: www.volareretreats.com

FB: breathedeepyoga1

Insta: @breathedeepyoga

Twitter: #breathedeepyoga

 

Trauma Release Exercises with Melissa Turnock

1:19 Introduction to Melissa Turnock

2:35 Neurogenic Tremor

  • Returns NS to parasympathetic state
  • Richmond Heath of Melbourne brought TRE to Australia
  • Developed by David Berceli

4:35 TRE definition

  • Trauma Release Exercise
  • Developed in war-torn countries and places that experienced natural disasters. It is a mammalian response to trauma and stress.
  • Natural, involuntary tremors which release tension/tiredness in the muscles.
  • Tremors start in the adductors

9:32 TRE in a yoga class

  • Yoga asanas for 30 minutes
  • Tremoring – 15-20 minutes
  • Svasana – at least 15 minutes
  • Emphasis on breath throughout

12:50 Benefits to students of TRE

  • Sleep better
  • More alert
  • Opens spiritual/emotional state
  • Anxiety lessens
  • Helps injuries

17:45 Teach regulation and integration in class

Looking for irregular breathing, eye contact, engage in conversation, stop and start tremors so students know they are in control.

Contacts:

Email: mel@pittwaterpilates.com.au

Website: www.pittwaterpilates.com.au

FB: /pittpilatesandyoga/

Building Community with Ashley Adams

1:06 Introduction to Ashley Adams, owner of Fit Yoga Factory and author of “Zen and the Wonder Woman Complex” - a book to help mums build their tool kit for self-care.

2:12 Ashley defines building a community as creating a safe, comfortable space. Getting rid of whatever preconceptions someone may have of yoga teachers and yoga studios. She brings a real life perspective to yoga classes and yoga studios. She has a healthy mix of students from 13 to 73. Lots of moms that if they have to can bring their children to class so they don’t miss their yoga. Don’t have to be perfect, look perfect, or wear perfect yoga clothes. Her community helps her stay a real person. Its not a “perfectly perfect studio” or “perfectly perfect” yoga teachers, but rather real people who like yoga.

7:05 Ashley’s book – “Zen and the Wonder Women Complex” is the written version of what she is trying to achieve in the studio of being real and accepting that some days can be challenging. The book gives tips and tools on how to start each day with balance and intention.

9:15 Ashley started with online yoga classes (Leader of the Yoga Mom Rebellion) and many of her viewers asked where they could take classes with her in person.  So she explored starting a yoga studio in her hometown of Tarpon Springs, FL in the USA. She found a space and opened full time in February 2018. One of her unique classes is Wine Down Wednesday where they have a short class, drink some wine and share a potluck dinner. This can breakdown the perception of what a “yoga studio owner” is like to build a community of like-minded individuals.

13:30 Ashley’s tips on building community through a yoga studio: a) patience and b) accept that you are running a yoga studio and have two hats – a yoga hat and a business hat. Know the differences between those two and what are your strengths and weaknesses. Find others to help with your weaknesses while you use your strengths to build the studio and the business.

15:30 Started the studio because teaching a variety of venues, caused chaos in her life. She wanted to incorporate into her job the ability to fund her yoga dreams of continuing yoga education. She found a place to have the studio and she can do podcasts, classes and workshops, etc.,  out of one place. Wanted to stay in the yoga world instead of moving between the yoga world and the world of another job.

18:00 Ashley and her teachers have developed systems to allow anyone to take any class regardless of experience or ability. They try to direct people to appropriate classes: emphasising that the class is not ready for you yet instead of you aren’t able to do this class. They modify and work with anyone (including pre-class one on one’s) to help students find the safest way to do yoga in the class they want to attend. Acceptance is a subject brought up often to help people accept where their body is on the that day.

25:05 Ashley’s studio has multiple classes and 3-4 teachers. She started with a full, consistent schedule so that current and prospective students know she will be open and able to provide a variety of classes. Run’s regular hours 5:30 am to sometimes 9:30 pm on the weekdays and only one class on the weekends.

Contacts:

Website: www.fityogafactory.com

FB: fityogafactory

Instagram: fityogafactory

Twitter: fityogafactory

Periscope: ashleyadams1

Book: “Zen and the Wonder Women Complex” on Amazon and www.fityogafactory.com

Yoga Impact with Nancy Candea

1:23 Introduction of Nancy Candea and Yoga Impact

3:15: In 2009, moved from Hawaii to Boulder, Colorado USA. Wanted to teach more marginalised populations and give back. Started teaching in women’s shelter and a client helped her establish a non-profit charity.  In addition to providing yoga to marginalised communities, the charity also wanted to provide teacher training to individuals from these communities.

Nancy teaches at the VA at a women’s trauma unit (for those sexually assaulted in the military). As individuals left the program they asked Nancy for recommendations for where they could take yoga in their community. She didn’t know and started the Yoga Impact teacher training. Students will feel more comfortable if the teacher understands what the students have experienced. As a result, in 2017, Yoga Impact teacher training graduated 17 people of color and one week remains for the teacher training offered on the Navajo Reservation. Some trainees have already been teaching in the community.

Yoga Impact provides resources – both monetarily and other resources – for teachers that have a vision for their community that improves wellness. As an example, Nancy used to teach at the Boulder Women’s jail and when a student finished her sentence, she asked Nancy how she could take teacher training. Yoga Impact funder her training and she has taken over the yoga classes at the jail, works with the parole officers and others that provide support to help students with the transitions from jail to living on their own. 

9:45 Nancy and the board are currently expanding Yoga Impact’s vision to help support new teachers as they begin to teach in their communities. It may include financial support, mentoring, or training on how to be an entrepreneur to start wellness communities.

10:44 They want to expand the reach of Yoga Impact into more communities by working with small business, corporations, and entrepreneurs to expand their financial base.

13:50 There are a variety of sponsorships to support Yoga Impact: individual sponsorships, small business and corporate, and yoga studio sponsorships are available.

17:57 How to work with corporations or entrepreneurs. Providing a well thought out program that targets the corporation’s or entrepreneur’s community with a specific request that requires little corporate effort is often successful.

20:56 What is the contribution of Yoga Impact? There is a large community of connected people who want to serve – a network of people who want to reach out and be part of the upliftment of humankind.

 

Contacts:

Website: www.yogaimpact.org

Email: yogaimpact @gmail.com

FB: yogaimpact 501C3

Instagram: yogaimpact

Acute Trauma - Self Care with Diana Tokaji

Diana Tokaji Part 2

Self-Care during Acute Trauma

1:00 Wrote a book “Six Women in a Cell” of her experience with assault by police. It isn’t a yoga therapy how-to, tells stories of the womens’ experience. Reader and listener share the experience. Story of what it takes to survive. It’s for any survivor and those that work with survivors.

5:20 Diana’s assault occurred three years ago. This time frame has allowed her to start speaking publicly. This and working with clients with similar problems requires a lot of self-care, emotional rebalancing and release.

7:00 Self Care Tips: what restores each of us comes from what we love. Soon after the assault took up boxing – contact, rhythm – really helped. She dances, moves, shares. Recommends that yoga therapists learn re-evaluation counselling where the counsellor is trained to be present, a quality listener to another person. Yoga therapists should be available to each other using this technique.

10:50 Presence is being aware of what the body is asking or trying to do. Learning what it really takes to be present. It is the best gift you can give anybody. In a session, visiting different scenes of Diana’s assault, I knew nobody wanted to hear about the assault, or what I went through. When the therapists described the defeat she saw in me, the dam broke and I talked about it. The yoga therapists held the space while those scenes replayed.

16:03 Diana’s book Six Women in a Cell telling the story of her assault experience is written with only a few edits remaining. Then she will be looking for an agent and publisher. The performance based on the book is another avenue for the story. Performance was a carrot for Diana’s  GoFundMe site to fund writing the book. The GoFundMe has been successful in providing funds. (See resources for the finding the site if you would like to donate.)

21:30 The physical aspects in yoga therapy (e.g., mudras) are very helpful. Pull, press, push the hands and the being registers the courage needed in life. Creates a sense of tone; translates to the mental and emotional states. The physical practices are equally important.

Contacts

dianatokaji@gmail.com

FB: Diana.tokaji.1

Resources:

Yoga Therapy Today, Diana Tokaji, “ Yoga Therapy as Early Intervention for the Acute Stage Following Assault or Trauma: Highlights from a Self-Case Report”, Winter, 2018, p.42

www.GoFundMe.com  search for Diana Tokaji

Acute Trauma with Diana Tokaji

Diana Tokaji Part 1 - Acute Trauma

1:10 Introduction to Diana Tokaji

2:16 Acute Stage of Trauma following assault. Acute state can appear at any stage to life. Some of the go too’s of yoga therapy may not be appropriate but may put the body in danger. Body may need to rally to face challenges of acute state. Acute stage is survival state. “Yoga Therapy Today” Winter, 2018, Diana’s article  recommend rest and relaxation for PTSD and trauma. But body may be in acute stage which is a state of survival which is the right state for the body to be in. Putting it into relaxation can drop the body into freeze state which could be dangerous.

9:00 Aspects of Diana’s protocol for acute trauma: vigilance, head-centered, legs parallel, close chain, quads and glute engaged, eyes open, heels on the ground. Vigilance = be able to see all around, can scope your horizons. If client wants to be in relaxation pose, Diana may offer to be vigilant for them. These aspects meet the body’s need to watch out for danger.

15:00 Presence is needed to know what is required for a client in that moment. Yoga therapists and teachers may have too shallow a knowledge of trauma. Have to meet the wisdom of the sympathetic NS. This approach gives another frame with a client with acute trauma. These ideas are becoming more well-known and accepted.

19:45 “I teach courage, physically and emotionally. I always reject shame. I offer specific cues and direction to rally muscle as well as mind support.” Fear can be overwhelming. Need executive function to deal with the aftermath of an assault –legal, medical, relationship, etc. Plus fear of the assaulter returning. Trauma is like a rupture of your being.

Contacts

dianatokaji@gmail.com

FB: Diana.tokaji.1

Resources:

Yoga Therapy Today, Diana Tokaji, “ Yoga Therapy as Early Intervention for the Acute Stage Following Assault or Trauma: Highlights from a Self-Case Report”, Winter, 2018, p.42

Chronic Pain with Dayna Culwell

Dayna Culwell – Yoga for Chronic Pain

1:30 Introduction to Dayna Culwell

3:08 Using yoga to interrupt the pain signals. Alert from brain that there is pain and something be done. Sometimes the pain signals become mixed and that the wound that originally caused the pain is healed but the pain continues. The brain needs to be reset. Start with grounding and breathing. Can redirect the pain signals if you can learn a strong focus through yoga; readjust pain signals so that you don’t notice them (as much) or reset so that the brain stops sending false pain signals. Reground: pain makes us lose perspective, power of pain is very strong (survival mechanism). Reground: connecting with the earth (i.e., child pose).

13:00 Chronic Pain Programs in Hospitals: Dayna’s teacher developed and taught the physicians of the hospital. Seeing the value, the physicians helped implement the program. Leads to better recuperation because yoga can address the changes due to the emotional impact of the illness and treatment. Program includes grounding and breathing based on the kosha model, start with physical body and then go through the rest of the koshas.

20:00 Has started meeting 60+ women in their homes and them yoga to meet the student’s goals. Together they create a yoga space in the student’s home so that they have a place to practice. Discuss things like where can you keep your props, do you have a clear wall space, how will the space work? This increases compliance with the practice that Dayna designs for each student. She is also seeing clients in nursing homes and working with people with dementia. She uses music, talks softly, has a kind expression and the students start to positively react to that and follow her movements. Caregivers at the home may also take the class next to their client which is beneficial for both.

29:00 Dayna is very interested in and wants to interact with others on the subject of yoga for scoliosis. She would like to hear from others that may want to do a project on using yoga to help those with scoliosis.

Contact Details:

Email: yogawithdayna@gmail.com

Website: yogawithdayna.net

FB: yogawithdayna

Trauma Explained with Nityda Gessal

Trauma Explained

1:12 Introduction to Nityda Gessal

4:15 When is yoga appropriate for someone in trauma. Need tools when beginning therapy or yoga. Touch can be a trigger for people with trauma. Get permission to touch several times during class.

Need referral list for therapists for students. Yoga is “yoga therapy lite”. If students  describe behaviours of hurting themselves or others, tell you their trauma history, then a yoga teacher should give them a referral for a therapist or if in therapy to see their therapist.

13:32 Teaches trauma informed yoga for therapists and teachers. Therapists are accepting of yoga; accepting of alternative modalities. Therapists understand that trauma is held in the body, right side of the brain and trauma work needs to include movement. Trauma is held in the right side of the brain but fragmented = fragmented, intrusive thoughts. Traditional talk therapy is left brained and can’t reach the trauma. Need to access the right brain, creativity, movement. Yoga integrates the right and left brain. Intrusive thoughts are all right brained and need to integrate the logical, rational left brain to understand the thoughts.

18:30 Yoga movement to help trauma as opposed to restorative yoga. Holding in restorative yoga is so long allows intrusive thoughts. People need to feel sensation in the body, perhaps yin yoga which holds to feel sensation in the body is conducive to healing trauma. People need to move through their trauma. Keep talking keep them present in restorative poses.

22:06 Trauma-informed training for yoga teachers. Significant education about what is trauma, prevalence (in a class of 25, 3 will have diagnoses of PTSD and 15 will have trauma issues), how is trauma stored in the Nervous System and the brain, trauma therapies and referrals. Invitational language, sensitive to issues of trauma survivors. Important for teachers to have knowledge of the trauma informed approach.

30:00 Nityda has started creating and posting trauma focussed youtube videos. Yoga practices for trauma.

Contact:

Nityda@talkwithnityda.com

www.traumaconscious.com

You Tube Videos – google Nityda Gessal

Yoga for All

1:14 - Introduction of Siv Havik

2:37 - Students mostly pay the donation minimum but a few do pay more as they can.  Norway's good economy and support makes it possible for some to donate more.

6:15: Siv began the studio because she could not afford to go to yoga classes as much as she wanted to and she has a strong desire to provide diversity in her town regarding yoga. She wanted to make it possible for everyone that may be interested in participating in yoga to find a place to do so. They have several 1000 members now.

9:00 Teacher come to Siv to volunteer their time and Siv has not had to recruit teachers. Siv was the original teacher and she taught two classes with a donation-based focus. She rented a space for each class and only had to cover the cost of the rent for each class. As the concept grew, Siv acquired a space for the donation-based studio and teachers began volunteering to give classes in their specialities. So their schedule is very diverse with many different yoga specialities and different times. It remains donation based and the donations are used to maintain the studio. One offering is medical yoga which is more accepted as a modality to help those recovering or for certain illnesses. 

14:30 - As the studio processes were put into place and many things became routine, Siv found she had extra capacity. She  decided to start the first Yoga Festival in her town of Stavanger, Norway. All the proceeds go to charities to stop child marriage and sex slavery. There are villages in Nepal that are just brothels and children work in these brothels. Siv and the studio work with charities that provide orphanages for these children or work with very poor villages that sell their children to pimps. The charity provides schools and help for these villages. 

18:30 - Benefits to the community of the donation-based model. It allows a lot of people that wouldn't consider yoga classes because of the cost to access yoga. It creates diversity as many different kinds of yoga are offered by different teachers teaching their specialities. Classes are offered at diverse times. The studio, according to Siv, belongs to the students as much to Siv and the other teachers. 

What are the critical aspects to have a functioning donation-based studio: a) teachers work as volunteers, b) donation-based costs, and c) diversity of offerings and class times. Siv also suggests that at the beginning start with a small number of classes and low cost for rent, etc.

33:28 Siv's dream is to have donation-based studios spread to other places and countries. If anyone would like to start a donation-based studio, Siv offers to be a resource to them to help them get started.

Contacts:

email: naanorskkurs@gmail.com

website: www.yogastavanger.no

FB: www.facebook.com/yogastavanger/

Burn it down for the nails

Burn it down for the nails with Kristen Krash

1:26 Introduction - Kristen Krash - Yogi for 16 years, teacher for much of that and 2 years ago moved to Ecuador to build a substainable nature retreat.

3:17  - Yoga in the three eras of her life

Student of Yoga, teacher of yoga and as an ecological entrepreneur. For the 7-8 years of teaching, it was very soul satisfying but things began to change. It became very difficult financially, Kristen turned 40 and began looking for a way to change her life. 

She and her partner developed a sustainable living vision for a place in Ecuador. They found some land, lived in a tent for 5 months while they built the first building. She is doing hard, physical labour but yoga is helping her build focus at this stage. It is also contributing to her creativity.

10:44 Burn it down for the Nails

Yoga has changed: lots of competition for students, the veneer of the corporate vision, misbehaving or worse of the "gurus", and yoga for goats, yoga with beer, and yoga and the stripper pole all dilute the essence of yoga.

Burn it down for the nails means to Kristen to find the essence of yoga that should continue and get rid of the "veneer" of competition, odd niches, and the corporate values. 

Unforgiven video by Metallica depicts someone taking their whole life to attempt one thing while they had the key to do the same thing the whole time. Finding the essence of yoga is within all of us; we have the key. Not attending so many classes, building a home practice, and finding the yoga that resonates with you can help you find your own unique key. 

35.30 Kristen now teaches yoga to the visitors to their sustainable living property in Ecuador. Yoga is still part of her life and she is optimistic about yoga. It was helped her immensely when she needed it and believes it can be of help to others if we get to the essence of yoga. 

39:15: Suena de Vida is Kristen and her partner's sustainable property. They have their own protected water source from a spring), it is situated in a tropical rain forest and it is only 3 hours from the Quito airport. They have a guest house, a communal kitchen, a bathroom and a large garden (as well as the spring). 

Contacts: 

www.suenodevida.org

www.facebook.com/suenodevida.ecu

info@suenodevida.org

Yoga Moments for Stress

Small discrete practices for stress and anxiety with Stephannie Weikert

1:39 How to make yoga philosophy more understandable with metaphors and stories. Simple postures, and integrate practice into daily routines.

2:50 Stephanie develops simple, but complete practices for her clients based on practicality and do-ability.

3:33 Developed this methodology based on her personal experience of being very stressed and anxious in her early twenties. The stress led to a body focused, repetitive behaviour similar to nervous habits. Introduced to yoga but could not make a consistent time to go to class given her schedule. She would do a simple forward bend, breathe deeply and developed a personal mantra to handle the stress and anxiety. She noticed she became less reactive and more centred. A 3 -5 minute practice can be integrated into the habits of your life and shifts mindset.

9:40 Benefits to students/clients: Two programs - Shift Happens - very basic, practical, doable, and tools to turn practice into a lifelong habit. 45% of daily activities are routines that we do everyday with little thought. Tapping into the science of habit building to turn daily routines into opportunities for a daily yoga practice. 3 steps to building a new habit - trigger, routine and reward. Using these three steps starting very small and slowly building to a practice helps someone integrate a new habit into their life.

32:45 Other course offered by Stephannie is Make Peace with Stress takes more time and delves deeply into self-study, learning to surrender when appropriate to intention setting. Learning what is the real cause of stress and how we deal with it and how we want to deal with it.

42:00 On Stephannie's website (www.stephannieweikert.com) you can take a stress test to identify your stress type and a short practice for that stress type.

Contacts: website: www.stephannieweikert.com email: stephannie@makepeacewith stress.com FB: www.facebook.com/stephannieweikertyogatherapy Instagram: stephannie weikert  

How Yoga has Changed

How Yoga Has Changed with Beth Spindler

3:45: Questioning among yoga teachers and students about how yoga has evolved and what it should be. It's not just doing poses - it is acknowledging that people have different bodies, nervous systems. etc. Advertising presents a very different face of yoga. Beth is seeing a shift to addressing yoga for different ages and abilities.

8:20 Senior Yoga: a few years ago, Beth saw mature students wanting to take her training for the first time. A yoga teacher must understand therapeutics in regard to aging to teach this group. Beth's approach is to alleviate pain. Yoga is general is moving forward to include everyone. However there is a misconception that yoga is generally therapeutic but its not. For the aging population, a teacher has to be knowledgeable about modifications for poses, etc. Look to the intelligence of applying poses to individual humans. Takes applying this concept to ask students to; "notice", "pay attention", "is this too much or too little". Having people notice "Can I breathe in this posture. If not, then I am out of my range of appropriate practice."

33:40 I am moving away from poses and more toward appropriate movement. Approximating the shapes of poses is wrong.

Contacts: email: spindler.beth@gmail.com website: www.teachtoinspire.com FB:https://www.facebook.com/vbethspindler http://www.faceboook.com/TimeToInspireJournal/YogaTherapy@Spindler.Beth www.linkedin.com/in/beth-spindler-eryt-ciayta2ab1014/